Welcome!

Welcome to life without Polyethylene Glycol. If you’ve just discovered you have a sensitivity or allergy to polyethylene glycol, you’ll need to learn how to find it, how to avoid it, and what alternatives there are.

This is a site where you can find resources and share your experience living a life free of glycol compounds.

While it takes quite a bit of detective work and assertiveness, it is possible to live without glycols.

This site is for people with allergies to glycol compounds, for health care practitioners, and for anyone wanting to know about life with an allergy to ubiquitous, invisible ingredients. Please contact me if you have resources to add or questions. I’m not a medical professional – just a person with a serious allergy to a set of commonly found ingredients. This site is only for informational purposes and not to take the place of medical diagnosis or treatment.

I hope it helps you live better.
Amber Dennis

Advertisements

113 Comments on “Welcome!”

  1. DC
    November 29, 2014 at 10:21 pm (Edit)

    I seem to have an allergy to polyethylene. I was briefly wearing surgical masks during flu season when I went to crowded places. And each time my nose would start running. I’d also sneeze, and for a while afterward my lungs would hurt. The woven polyethylene fiber masks were sold by a company that imported them from China.
    Now my daughter has a similar issue, most notably with lung discomfort. She tells me that she got a new mattress and covered it with a polyethylene mattress protector, which was made in China. Almost from the day she started sleeping on the new mattress she has had respiratory pain. Have others had similar problems with polyethylene?

    Like
    Reply

    ChickenLittleInk
    November 29, 2014 at 11:21 pm (Edit)

    I haven’t heard anyone say that they were sensitive to polyethylene fibers, but you can develop an allergy to anything. When I first discovered I had trouble with glycols, almost everyone I talked to said they’d never heard of it. Some pharmacists were downright insistent that it couldn’t possibly be true. Now people are coming out of the woodwork with sensitivities and allergies to things we all thought were very safe. Our world is now full of strange chemicals made in laboratories and factories. It only makes sense that some of us would be affected by it. We are the canaries in the coal mine, I think. If I hear of anyone who has good info on polyethylene fiber, I’ll post about it and link to it.
    Let me know if you find anything else out about it.

    Like

  2. Susan smith says:

    I am allergic to PEG. It seems to be in everything, and I am feeling worse and worse. How do people eat?!

    Like

    • Oh, Susan, I’m so sorry you’re feeling so bad! What kind of reaction do you have?
      I haven’t seen PEG in so many foods – mostly in medicines and body care products, but I’ve seen PG used to keep foods from freezing. It’s really good you’re looking closely at the labels, because you’re right – glycols are in a growing number of things.
      What foods are you finding PEG in? I’d be curious to know.

      Like

  3. Susan Smith says:

    PEG is in so many foods, coconut milk, certain oils, chocolate, salad dressings. It is sprayed on apples and citrus fruit, is in cottage cheese as a deforming agent, and so many more. It is in almost all products the Body Shop. It is in many baked goods. It seems ubiquitous!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Jim Burns says:

    Thanks for the information. I also just started a wordpress blog. https://polyethelynegyycolallergy.wordpress.com/

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Grady says:

    Hi, I have an allergy to polyethylene glycol. Two colonoscopy preps, Mirilax and Osmoprep caused a rash on my torso, legs and arms. Also swelling of my hands and tongue. No I use magnesium citrate and Ducolax pills. A day more prep, clear liquids and jello but no adverse effects.

    Thanks

    Like

    • Oh, Grady, I understand. It’s important to check labels now that you know – my experience has been that the more times you are exposed to it, the more severe the reaction gets. Take a look at the post Be a Label Detective for some ideas on how to do that.
      Please comment if you find resources you’d like to share or if you have questions.

      Amber

      Like

      • Rachel says:

        Five yrs ago I broke out hives all over my body with one dosage of Miralax. Went to ER. Dr said it was not the Miralax. Later I developed extreme fatigue, IBSD got worst. Started having bladder infections, yeast infections. Lack of sex drive, irregular heartbeats. Was also diagnosed with type two diabetes. Gerds followed with alot of belching. For yrs I was house bound. Dr told me to exercise as I had gained weight. Tried to do water exercises. Had severe vaginal burning. Also my armpits were itching bad. I noticed my Estrace creame had propylene gylcol, do did my deodorant . Remembered my break out with Miralax. Found out it is pure Polypropylene Gycol. Rrsearched all my meds. Seven of nine had PG. So did my hygiene products & foods I ate. Have weaned myself from five of the meds. Waiting to be tested by allergistist. Had patch test done on skin for contact dermatitis. Came out negative. Hoping next test for ingested items show something. Trying to avoid products with PG. Has anybody faced same problems?

        Like

      • kkuzak5gks says:

        Our allergy to polyethylene glycol really means we are allergic to ALL the glycols and chemically similar ones such as the polysorbates, sodium laureth sulfate, glycerin, etc. Using Amber’s Label Detective list is very important. Besides the allergic responses you mentioned such as hives, rash, itch, I have also experienced severe vaginal issues because of the use of 3 kinds of estrogen (including Estrace) and Clobetisol Propionate steroid which was prescribed to improve the skin in that area. Of course, it was loaded with PG/PEG too. I truly believe that a major reason why we developed these allergies in the first place was because our digestive barrier has been compromised. I continue to fight yeast infections and GERD, but am now relying on food supplements, digestive enzymes and vitamins and minerals to aid in detoxing and digesting instead of acid reducing medication like Prevacid. Because SO many pharmaceuticals and personal care products use PG and PEG, I rely mostly on DIY products and I’m slowly improving. Best wishes for your continued improvement as well.

        Like

      • Natascha Fuller says:

        Hi, just wanted to let people know that PEG is in the contrast you drink for CT scans also. While my 12 year old daughter was in the ER from a severe anaphylactic reaction to Polyethylene glycol she was given contrast for a CT scan anda new wave of reaction hit. I quickly researched and found that PEG is usually in the contrast. The ER staff had no idea. They even told me it was fine to give to her when I asked about ingredients. They never once checked the inactive ingredients in any medications they later gave her. A lot of doctor don’t believe her allergy, even her pediatric GI.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Natascha,
        I can’t imagine how scared you must have been! If your doctor doesn’t believe you, there’s not much you can do except find another doc – if that’s even possible. Hospital personnel often don’t realize that the inactive ingredients aren’t listed on the package or label and unfortunately, it’s up to us to explain – often in the worst of circumstances. Sometimes if you can get through to a nurse who will listen, you can get them to give you the product insert, which can be a lifesaver. Of course, if the ingredients aren’t listed as a glycol but as some proprietary product name, it’s even harder to recognize. I carry a paper copy of the list of synonyms for glycols and pull it out when someone says, “Just tell me what it is you’re allergic to and I’ll look on the insert for you” One glance at it and they usually hand over the insert.
        I hope that she is better and you’re able to find an understanding doctor. Please keep us posted.

        Like

    • I want to jump in here and clarify that there are people who do not react to all glycol compounds. I don’t know if I’m allergic to butylene or ethylene glycol because I decided to avoid them based on my reactions to PG and PEG. The gal who runs TheAllergista.com blog only reacts to PG, not PEG, so she can use products that would send me to the ER.

      There’s not a definitive answer to why you might react to one thing and not another, but I believe in the “bucket theory,” that your immune system responds to any number of things every day and may react to things strongly on one day and less so on another based on how much toxic load you have in your system at any one time.

      I am allergic to PEG and PG, and I will react to either whenever I come in contact, but there are other things that may just cause mild dermatitis based on how much stress I’m under, how clean I’m eating, how many chemicals I’ve come in contact with or how much I’ve been sleeping. Other times the reaction may be hardly noticeable.

      Do you react to PEG when it’s only used in the ink used on the outside to number a pill? Or only when there is enough to overflow your “bucket?” When you react, do you get hives, or does your throat swell and threaten to cut off your breathing? We are all very complex machines and I only really know what happens for me and how I react. Use our experiences as a guide, but your own wisdom should always prevail.

      Amber

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rhonda says:

      I too developed hives with the colonoscopy prep..so switched next procedure to mag citrate. Wonderful…no hives, but the cleanser they use after colonoscoopy procedure contains polyethylene glycol; hence my anal and genital area covered in hives. Guess I can’t win.

      Like

      • Hi Rhonda,
        The people who care for us in the hospital don’t always realize just how careful we have to be! Sometimes I’ve been able to get them to understand by asking them to think of me as a kid who is allergic to peanuts, and glycols are like peanuts used to be – hidden in a lot of places because people think they’re safe for everybody.
        I bring my own gel because the lube they use for colonoscopy (or ultrasound, or any exam requiring it) comes in a bulk pack with no label. I assume it has PEG or PG in it.
        The magnesium citrate has worked for me as well, but the process is much worse than the colonoscopy itself! If they can put a man on the moon, why can’t they find an easier way to do that danged prep?
        Amber

        Like

  6. ducloux pills have polyethylene glycol in them check the label… i used ducloux and peglite for a colonoscopy and had an anaphylactic reaction the only ingredient that was in both meds was polyethylene glycol …. also later used an hair product that gave me the same reaction

    Like

    • Yes, the “PEG” in “PEGLite” is polyethylene glycol. There are alternatives – the magnesium citrate prep is a reasonable substitute and is the prep docs always used until these new PEG versions came on the market.
      I’m so sorry you had that experience. Now that you’ve had such a severe reaction, you should become familiar with the ChemIndustry.com site and learn to read labels like a pro. Your life depends on your ability to find out what is in anything that goes on or in your body. Check out the other pages in this blog for more resources and please let me know if you find any new info we need to share with others in the same situation. Even people who are medical professionals may not understand until you share what you know with them. Stay patient, polite and persistent with anyone who doesn’t get it.
      Amber

      Like

  7. Debby Davies says:

    Hi Amber,
    I’m so grateful for your page! I discovered I was allergic to PEG after using a product for constipation called Movicol which is mostly macrogol 3550. I’ve since reacted to 2 supplements and have discovered subsequently each time they contain macrogol, one of them caused extensive hives and swelling of my eyes, the other times just hives. I’m also finding there are certain toothpastes, mouth washes, shampoos and deoderants I can’t use as they cause local iirritation. Whilst my GP is sympathetic , she’s never had anyone with this allergy before. It seems really difficult to find out what contains PEG. Its concerning that it seems to be in some injectable medications too which would cause more severe reactions. The pharmacist seems to be somewhat glib when I ask if it contains PEG/ macrogol which doesn’t give me great confidence.

    Thanks
    Debby

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Debby,
      I had to go to several pharmacies before I found a pharmacists that didn’t think I was nuts. I was fortunate to find one, and everyone there is now used to my requests for a look at the product literature before I leave the window each time.

      If there is a compounding pharmacy near you, try there. Their business is built around custom medications for people with allergies and they may become your best resource. There are also mail order compounding pharmacies, although I haven’t used one. There is one in Portland, Oregon called Stroheckers that I’ve heard is good. I would make sure you talk to someone on the phone though, so you can be sure they understand you want to avoid a chemical that is an inactive ingredient.

      Be prepared t pay more for your prescriptions and pay a higher co-pay if you have insurance. If your insurance doesn’t cover compounded prescriptions, your doctor can fill out a form that tells your insurance company why you are unable to take the recommended drug in their formulary. Not all insurance companies will accept this, but many do. Another reason why having a sympathetic doc is a huge blessing.

      Best of luck,
      Amber

      Like

  8. AP says:

    Hi Amber,
    I took Polyethylene Glycol 3350 my whole pregnancy (even though it was a category C drug) and now my son has many allergies. I had no choice in the matter I tried not taking it for almost a year before I got pregnant and the Dr. looked at me one day and said you are going to have to be on it for the rest of your life or you are going to have to have surgery. I have been to 5 different allergiest and pediatricians for my son and they all tell me there is no way any of his allergies are caused by the PG 3350, that the medication would not have been obsorbed thru my sons body. My arguement is that it would have been in the umbilical cord and he could have gotten it that way. I am now doing my own experiments with any medications he is prescribed that have either PG or propylene glycol in them to have proof that he is allergic. Have you ever heard of anyone else who took it during their pregnancy and now their child has bad allergies?

    Like

    • Hi, Amanda,
      I haven’t heard about this but perhaps there are others who have had the same experience. I don’t know enough about how allergies work to know if this kind of sensitivity can be acquired during pregnancy. I would suggest looking for others with similar situations and sharing your story with them. Perhaps you can find some similarities. Because most practitioners don’t know it’s possible to have an allergy like we do, it’s up to us to gather as much info as we can and share with each other and with our health care professionals. Once they know that a growing number of us exist, we’re on our way to getting better care through awareness and education.Thanks for sharing your story. Stay in touch and maybe more people with the same situation will find you here.
      Amber

      Like

  9. Kerry Kuzak says:

    Could anyone please share their experiences with dental care and hospitalization since their diagnosis of a PEG allergy? I am in the midst of writing a dental and medical care treatment plan and will share it once finished. Also, I am very much interested in what’s being sprayed on our fresh produce, both conventional and organic. This is an interesting article–
    http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=dailytip&dbid=136

    Like

  10. Dental care: The topical anesthetic my dentist uses to numb the gums before the novocaine shot is called Emla and it has polyethylene glycol in it. I went to the compounding pharmacy and they made a numbing gel with lidocaine that works for me. I bring it every time I have dental work.

    Hospital visits: For colonoscopy, I use the magnesium citrate prep rather than the GoLytely or other polyethylene glycol product, and bring my own lubricating gel. For any other visit, I read all the product inserts for any thing they use or give me.

    For emergencies when I cannot speak, I have a RoadID bracelet with a phone number and link to a website with all my allergy information on it.

    How do others take care of themselves in this situation?

    Like

  11. Kerry Kuzak says:

    Thank you! Has your dentist had trouble finding the necessary adhesives, gels, puttys, waxes, etc. that is needed for temporary and restorative work? Does he/she have to have materials special ordered?

    Like

    • Hi Kerry,
      He hasn’t changed any of his products. I just asked for product info and looked them up, one by one. In some cases he had two options and I asked him to use one or the other, based on ingredients. Fortunately, the other products he uses have not used any glycols. There is something the hygienist uses that I’ve had some trouble with but I can’t figure out what it is. It may be a sugar alcohol with an unfamiliar name, but after I have my teeth cleaned I always have a reaction. Not hives or dermatitis, but my gums and the inside of my mouth react and it takes about a week to settle down.

      The problem with this allergy is that the manufacturers are free to change the inactive ingredients at any time without notice. Even a product we’ve used before many times can suddenly change formulation without warning, so checking every time with every product is important.

      That said, there are some medications I take, like Armour thyroid, that has a formulation that apparently isn’t helped by glycols and I have yet to find a version of any thyroid med that contains it. I haven’t seen any injectibles that contain glycols, but I also haven’t seen a lot of injectible medication either. I still have to check though, because I’m not a fan of hives and any medication or product can change inactive ingredients without warning.

      So my advice would be to make an appointment with your dentist a few weeks ahead of time and get product inserts on everything he or she plans to use, even those things that may only be needed if something unexpected is discovered – like root canal materials if you’re having a filling – and read the inserts. If they don’t have the insert anymore, get the product name and manufacturer and look it up.

      For anything unavailable in a form you can use, get the dentist to write a prescription for a compounded product and have it made for you. Your dentist may keep that for you, but it’s better if you keep it so you always have it, since it can’t be used on anyone else. Note that any products that are compounded – even those not normally requiring a prescription – will need a prescription to be filled at a compounding pharmacy. Also, your insurance may not pay for it, although many will on appeal if you have your doctor fill out a form.

      I’m interested in your treatment plan and what it’s for. Is it for you? If it’s for any kind of publication, please remember that the info you find on this blog is only the result of shared personal experience as consumers and patients. None of us are professionals or medical experts. But then, you knew that . . .


      Amber

      Like

      • Kerry Kuzak says:

        Thank you for your kind, thoughtful reply, Amber. Regarding dental cleaning–does the hygienist use pumice on your teeth? I have not had a problem with that. I have had a problem with their dental floss, though. I bring my own unwaxed kind.

        I am only writing protocols for both dental and medical treatment plans for myself, but will be happy to share a generic version with whoever wants it.I do not plan on posting it anywhere unless I am sure it is accurate and complete. At this point, I just have a rough copy. Of course, I am not a medical professional either.I will simply be supplying my dentist and doctors with an alternate names for PG/PEG list; things to avoid with my treatment; materials/medicines to investigate before using; general care instructions etc.Please e-mail me at the address below if you would like to see it.

        Again, thank you for your help!

        Like

  12. gr8shpr says:

    I have been having rosacea acne outbreaks which may be made worse by use of products containing PEG. It has just come to my attention that I may be making the situation worse, or even causing it from use of products containing petrol products. I used metrogel one night… to see if it would help/hurt. Had little bumps under the surface of skin the next day. I found out that Metro CREAM does not contain PEG. I have taken Miralax every day for 10 years. Recently, I developed violent nausea when taking even high quality vitamins (PEG? allergy)
    My daughter, who is nursing, only found relief with Miralax and I don’t think she takes it every day.
    My scalp breaks out with nearly any shampoo now… I thought it only broke out with shampoos containing wheat protein.
    So, I am looking for information on products that DO NOT contain PEG/macrogols.
    PRODUCTS WHICH DO SEEM TO WORK: I have had good luck with faerie organics minerals. For the last two days I have been using this instead of ELF blemish treatment (loaded with chemicals). FO brand is my go-to for makeup. Also now trying their lip balm which is free of petrol. My lips have been raw for a few years, too, so now trying to see if the lips do better without petrol.
    I do not want my daughter and grand children to use products which are supposedly safe, only to have formation/worsening of allergies.
    To Amber: yes, my daughter has bad allergies/asthma. PEG (Miralax) was not invented when she was little, however, I took an antihistamine when I was pg. Our asthma/allergist said he could not rule this out for making allergies worse, but to “just be careful!” (not helpful!)

    Like

    • Hi, Kay,
      I’m sorry you’re having trouble finding things that work. Believe me, I understand! I discovered that it took several days for my skin or scalp to calm down after I’d used something that wasn’t right for me. In the meantime, I wash with Dr. Bronner’s soaps – using it as a shampoo, too, though it’s not going to give you that bouncy look, for sure. I follow it with a lemon or vinegar water rinse. That seems to help things calm down rather quickly, although it can still take up to a week for things to clear out of my system. I also take a milk thistle supplement every day to help support my liver in clearing out toxins as quickly as possible.

      You might try Jarrow supplements, although I’d check the ingredients first to see if there are similarities with the ones you didn’t tolerate. You may be allergic to stearate, which is even more common than PEG.

      As for Miralax, you might consider ground flax seed in your breakfast cereal or juice instead. (if you put it in juice, drink it quickly for best results) It only takes a small amount (start with a teaspoon, work up to a tablespoon) and it also provides needed omega-3 nutrients that help with skin and counter inflammation. The most important thing about ground flax seed is to keep it cold. I keep mine in the freezer. It goes off very quickly with heat. You can tell fresh flaxseed meal because it has very little smell. If it smells fishy at all, it’s been exposed to heat and while it’s still OK to use for fiber purposes, it doesn’t taste as good and it loses Omega-3 when it’s exposed to heat.

      I’m not sure how we get allergies. My father worked in the electroplating industry and when I spent time with my dad at work, I remember the smell of acetone. I got to like it after awhile. It wasn’t the only chemical there, and there was no caution about limiting exposure for anyone there that I remember. I had a very stressful childhood and imagine my immune system was pretty overwhelmed with all that was going on. That may be why I am so chemically sensitive. I also started smoking in my teens and didn’t stop for any significant length of time until I was in my 30’s. Smoking gave me my first clues about chemical sensitivity. I had switched to American Spirit cigarettes, which are additive-free. A friend gave me a pack of my old cigarettes and I couldn’t smoke them. They made me sick. I went back to the American Spirits until I quit in 1997 and I haven’t smoked since, thank God.

      It’s possible that an antihistamine may have caused or worsened her allergies, but it’s also possible that there are a number of things, including inherited and environmental factors, as we well as just plain luck of the draw. The really lucky thing is that she has you as a resource to help her figure out how to find out how to stay as well as possible.

      I hope you are able to find products that work for you. You might check out the “What I Use” page to see if there is something there that might work, although I’m not allergic to wheat/macrogols so I don’t know if any of the products there contain those. As always, please check the label for your own sensitivities and share with us if you find things that work for you. I’ll look into Faerie Organics – thanks for the info.

      I hope you and your family are able to find what you need to live well. Thanks for your comment!
      Amber

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kerry Kuzak says:

        I hope you don’t mind me getting in on this conversation, but I have had some of the issues Kay has been facing. As a teenager/young adult, my dermatologists treated my acne with antibiotics (10 years!), dry ice treatments and a lot of foolishness. Prolonged use of antibiotics probably was the cause of my digestion issues and subsequent susceptibility to PG and PG as my allergens. Diet and nutrition play an EXTREMELY important role in providing a barrier for our immune systems to function properly. My adult rosacea was treated with Metro cream too. That cream contains glycerin which is an alternate name for PEG. My facial skin did not improve until I cleaned up my diet–very few simple carbs (sugar); high complex carbs (beans, nuts, whole grains, vegetables); cut out milk and dairy; and consume more omega 3’s fats and fiber, like in Amber’s flax seed. It might be wise to look into possible food allergies also. A HUGE difference in my intestines occurred when I began taking a daily probiotic. Please continue in your search to find answers for your own better health and avoid chemicals in food and products as much as possible.

        Best wishes,
        Kerry

        Liked by 1 person

    • Caroline says:

      In my experience, my glycol allergy was originally diagnosed as Rosacea by a few doctors. Finally, a dermatologist went through my routine and how it had changed and thankfully, found the problem. I am wary of any glycol all together. I didn’t realize that I had a problem with all glycol not just PG in the beginning. I avoid glycol in medications, personal care products, food, etc. I look for products that don’t have lots of ingredients and have mostly, if not all, natural ingredients. I study the synonyms for all glycols – there are many. I will google each ingredient in a product and cross reference synonym names in researching ingredients. I use EWG.ORG as a good reference. I made sure to share my allergy with my health care system and that it’s noted in my electronic records. My reaction to PEG in medication tends to be cummulative rather than acute – shortness of breath being the worst of my symtoms. Good luck. It’s a bad allergy.

      Like

      • Hi Caroline,
        Welcome! Thanks for your comments. I had never heard of glycol allergy being misdiagnosed as rosacea. Makes sense, and that will info may help others who come upon this blog. You’re lucky to have a dermatologist who really understands!

        Like

  13. gr8shpr says:

    I have a question: when a product states that it is “Organic” are the producers meaning “organic” as in nature-grown, or do they mean “organic” as in chemistry organic. Organic in chemistry means that the chemical formula contains Carbon (C), which would include petroleum products. Thank you

    Like

  14. Kerry Kuzak says:

    Anything living in nature is organic. For CONSUMERS, the certified organic label guide refers to food that has not been altered with synthetic ingredients and animal products which have not been given antibiotics or growth hormones. There are four levels of USDA organic: “100% organic” whereby all the ingredients are organic; “organic” whose products contain at least 95 to 99% ingredients by weight (the remaining ingredients are not available organically, but have been approved by the National Organic Program); “made with organic ingredients”–must contain 70 – 94% organic ingredients (will not bear the USDA Organic seal); and “other”–which also will not bear the organic seal and have less than 70% organic ingredients which can be listed on the information panel of the packaging.

    Hope this helps!

    Like

    • Kerry addresses (very well, thanks!) the certification of a whole product. Individual ingredients can be certified organic as well, without the product being certified.
      Unless a product says an ingredient is “certified organic,” you can’t assume anything. There are growers’ certifications (not as reliable) and third party certifications. The certifying agency makes a big difference as well: The US National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) certification is far looser than that of Oregon Tilth, for example. The NOSB has proposed allowing certified crops to include genetically modified organisms, irradiated ingredients and plants fertilized with sludge. Those were eventually rescinded, I think, but it shows that the certifying body and I don’t agree on the concept. I don’t trust that there aren’t agribiz companies exploiting loopholes in the certifications.
      Tilth certification on the other hand, is the strictest certification in the country and I’d trust anything they certify to be clean. There are other certifications overseas- Demeter International is also very trustworthy and one of the oldest third party certifiers in the world.

      It is not illegal to call an ingredient or product organic if it is not certified.

      Like

  15. Laura says:

    I am highly allergic to polyethylene glycol. Causes my throat to swell and sever migraines. I am trying to start a Facebook group Polyethlene Glycol Allergy. If you or anyone else wants to join. PEG is in everything I have to look every drug up before I take it because it’s in a lot of generic drugs.

    Like

  16. Laura’s facebook group is called Polyethylene Glycol Allergy
    Feel free to share your experiences there as well.

    Like

  17. Renee says:

    I found out I was allergic to PEG last year after taking miralax. Minutes after taking it my body was covered in hives and I was having trouble breathing. We went to the ER and they started an IV and prescribed several drugs for itching and inflammation……all of which contained PEG. I’ve had allergies all my life but this one is the hardest to deal with. A few months later my doctor prescribed other medications for me. Months later, after agonizing hives every night, I discovered they had PEG as well. That’s when I started to check everything and I’m still having some irritation so I really need to know everything that this stuff is in. After reading some of this blog it seems like if you’re allergic to PEG then you’re allergic to all glycols…..is that true?…..I really need to figure out what to avoid so I can feel better again. I regularly get hives and its driving me crazy. Thank you!

    Like

    • Oh, golly, Renee, that sounds awful. I know I react to both propylene and polyethylene glycol, but I don’t know if I react to other glycols because I make sure I never take them or use them. I made an assumption based on the allergy to PG and PEG, but other people may not have the same issues. It can’t hurt to avoid them all, even though it is a big frustration.
      What really kind of scares me is the number of synonyms for glycols. Look on the chemindustry site and see – and they are adding new ones all the time. Follow the instructions in the post for looking them up – it’s not intuitive.
      One of the things I’ve discovered is that glycols are usually not in injected or IV drugs. That’s not a guarantee, but if you can’t find the ingredients and it’s an emergency, choose the injectable rather than a pill. Better yet, find a list of allergy antidotes you can take and keep those on hand when you go to the hospital. Remember that the manufacturers on generics differ and there is no law that says they can’t change the inactive ingredients without notice. So you may be able to use a drug from one manufacturer, but not the very same drug from a different one. And the one you’ve been taking for years may suddenly include PEG if they decode to change the formula, so you have to check the product insert every time.
      It’s a hassle, but hives are worse!
      Please keep me posted on your progress. It helps if we share what we know.
      Amber

      Like

      • Renee says:

        Thank you for that information! I just had a flare up tonight and I really can’t figure out what is causing it! All my medications are now clear of it so I’m thinking I ate something that contained PG. Have you possibly come across a complete list of foods that contain PEG or PG? …..I’m so frustrated with this but I’m glad I’m not alone because when I tell a doctor or pharmacist the think I’m absolutely crazy! And most doctors have no idea what I’m even talking about! These chemicals are harmful and completely overlooked! Thank you for your support!

        Like

      • Have you seen the list of synonyms on the ChemIndustry site? It’s possible that something has a glycol in it that you didn’t recognize. With names like “fluka,” and “macrogol,” neither of which sound to me like glycols, it’s easy to overlook them.
        And no, there’s no list of foods or products that don’t contain glycols because for the vast majority of people, glycols are in the GRAS category – “generally recognized as safe,” and therefore, don’t need special labeling if the formula changes.
        We have to read every label, every time, unfortunately.
        This is probably what people who were allergic to peanuts or latex went through before it became common knowledge that latex or peanuts could cause allergies. It’s important that we educate everyone we can about this so that there is enough awareness that we can ask for proper labeling on cleaners, medicines and other products not currently required to provide label warnings.
        The readers on this blog are really helpful, and the resources here can give you tools to live well with this issue. It’s not easy, but it’s possible.
        Please share your experiences and let me know of any new resources you come across that have helped you. Together we can make this work.
        Be well,
        Amber

        Like

  18. kkuzak5gks says:

    Would you like a copy of my paper “Living with a Propylene Glycol/Polyethylene Glycol Allergy”? E-mail me at kerrykuzak@yahoo.com.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Brenda in Texas says:

    I have been using Blink Tears for my eyes and it has polyethylene glycol in it. I was wondering why everyday after I use it I start to feel like I have hay fever and I feel really weird. I usually feel good before I use it. I think that it makes my heart beat fast too.Has anyone else have this happen to them? .

    Like

    • kkuzak5gks says:

      I am allergic to propylene glycol and polyethylene glycol, so I avoid ALL the glycols. It looks like Blink Tears has PEG as its ACTIVE ingredient which makes it especially bad if you’re allergic to PEG. Many eye solutions seem to have PG, PEG or one of their derivatives in them. The one I occasionally use for redness and seasonal itching is a CVS brand called “Redness Relief Astringent”. It’s ingredients are: tetrahydrozoline, zinc sulfate, benzalkonium chloride, boric acid, edetate disodium, purified water, sodium chloride and sodium citrate. My husband uses a prescription lubricating medication called “Restasis” and it has glycerine and polysorbate 80 in it which should also be avoided if you have a glycol allergy.

      Like

  20. EW says:

    Hi everyone,

    I’m a young doctor who has researched PEG allergy and been involved in the mangement of seen 5 PEG allergic patients. Our experiences and findings have been complied in a paper on PEG hypersensitivity. Feel free to check it out.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27196817

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, bless you! This will make a big difference in the lives of us who live with this allergy. Your work provides professional validation to a problem we’ve suffered from for too long.
      I will link to your paper in a separate post as well so that readers can show your work to their doctors. This is a major step forward.
      Thank you!
      Amber

      Liked by 1 person

    • The Shaman says:

      another good read on this at same site http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4316229/ Anaphylactic Shock Caused by Ingestion of Polyethylene Glycol it pert near killed me 6/22/2016 it says in there “Approximately 1-20% patients who experienced anaphylaxis may experience secondary reactions within 1-72 hours, however, there is no reliable indicator to predict such recurrences ” so keep this in mind all if at 48 hrs they say you can go home and you feel well …ask yourself how far of a drive id it to go back should it hit after the 48 hour mark after you leave

      Like

      • Hello, Shaman,
        Thanks for this article and the warning. Your advice could save someone’s life if they are having a severe reaction!
        And I apologize for not approving your comment til now. I have had some complications after my second knee surgery and I’ve had weeks of being offline as a result.
        Welcome, and thanks again.
        Amber

        Liked by 1 person

  21. Natascha Fuller says:

    Ladies, please help. My 12 year old daughter has a serious Polyethylene glycol allergy. Anybody have suggestions for tampons and pads/liners safe to use

    Like

    • Hi Natascha,
      I wasn’t aware of PEG in tampons/pads or liners. You might try some of the alternatives, like washable cloth pads, or these: Maxim also Natracare. Another cloth pad company is New Moon.
      Best of luck, and let us know if you find a good solution.

      Amber

      Like

      • Natascha Fuller says:

        Thank you, I just feel like it’s everywhere. Some tampons and pads have an outer layer made of polyethylene and almost all plastic applicators are polyethylene plastic. I’m just weary of anything with this word because she has had anaphylactic reactions before.

        Like

    • kkuzak5gks says:

      Per my support group: Natracare; Diva Cup; Glad Rags; Organyc 100% Organic Cotton Tampons and perhaps 7th Generation Chlorine Free Organic Cotton Tampons. Always Dri Weave is very bad–polyethylene and Soft Cups have PEG in them too. Organic cotton is preferred because of the PG-laden pesticides on regular cotton crops You may find this article useful: http://Ireadlabelsforyou.com/tampons-and-sanitary-pads-safe-or-toxic/

      Like

    • Cheryl Zeitler says:

      I have a PEG sensitivity and use the seventh generation type of pads. And even those have a polymer. They recently changed packaging and I called to ask about ingredients. They all have the polymer, but the old labels did not consistently mention it. But the other types (always, kotex) all make my skin raw. Just make sure she changes the pad often. I use the ultra thin with wings overnight or super. They do not break down the blood, so thus changing them often helps with those with sensitive noses like myself, or a self consious teen.
      Tampons I use unscented always radiant, but never had an issue with any type.
      I am going to order a menstrual cup off Amazon soon. I am just reading a lot of reviews to decide which would be best to try first. Because my PEG issue is getting worse quickly and I am just avoiding as many chemicals as I can.
      Also, it is way cheaper to order seventh gen products online from Amazon or other drugstore type sites. About $4. Compared to $6 at whole foods.
      Good luck and hang in there.

      Like

      • Cheryl Zeitler says:

        An update on menstrual cups.
        I purchased the Athena cup (blue) off Amazon. I tried it today and within 15 min started the usual sleepy feeling and then progressively got worse so I could barely remove it. Then I was still too tired and weak to move for an hour. It says it is made of medical grade silicone. So it could be a separate issue, but just in case, I wanted to give you and your daughter (and anyone else) a heads up. It seems this brand is made in china, which I didn’t realize. So please use caution, although I am sure you already do.

        Like

  22. Wendie Stevens says:

    My reaction to propylene glycol is not the typical skin irritant reaction. It actually causes my body to go into CNS Depression when ingested. It is quite scary and potentially life threatening. When used topically, my symptoms mimic that of fibromyalgia. Severe muscle and joint aches. I have changed hair color, cleaning supplies, beauty products, and am careful of what I eat. However, I cannot always control my surroundings. The simple wiping of desks with a cleaning wipe that children use during a school day, can cause me to become extremely ill. Even the antidote for CNS Depression contains propylene glycol. I do wonder how many fibromyalgia patients, actually have severe adverse reactions to propylene glycol instead. As strange as it sounds, I have found blueberries and pomegranates to help counteract serious reactions. Looking for more insight and help regarding antidote in case of emergency.

    Like

    • Welcome Wendie,
      When I hear people say they can’t take one drug or another, I often wonder if ti’s the active ingredient they have issues owith or one of the inactives, and they just don’t now it yet.
      You might check out a compounding pharmacy to see if they can make you a safe alternative for central nervous system depression that doesn’t contain PG or PEG. Feel free to join in with questions or solutions you’ve found for successfully dealing with your chemical sensitivity. I’ve heard that blueberries do help some people, and I’m glad to hear that pomegranates work for you as well.
      Glad you’re here!
      Amber

      Like

    • Cheryl Zeitler says:

      Thank you so much for your post response.
      I also have CNS depression as a reaction, but I never knew what to call it. I would always say, “it is like I am having a stroke without the asymmetry, everything slows and I am too exhausted to move or talk or function”. I also have fibromyalgia symptoms and swollen ache joints after reactions. Along with the typical rashes and my outer dead skin layer comes off from topical use.
      The first reaction I had was to miralax and I know the ER workers thought I was insane or on drugs. I could barely move but I kept smiling and feeling my mouth to make sure it wasn’t lopsided (I had a friend who had a stroke at 23, so I was worried that was the reason). It is comforting (and sad) to know I am not the only person with this problem.

      Like

      • Wendie Stevens says:

        Wow! You are the first I have encountered with the same symptoms! Terrifying to say the least!
        I’m learning daily what it looks like to rid myself and environment (as far as I can control). I’ve also learned something new of possible interest! I was diagnosed with a thyroid nodule 6 years ago. Each year I’ve either had more Or they have grown. I just had my annual visit, and was informed that not only do I not have new nodules, 3 stayed the same size and one actually shrunk! The doctor was shocked! I am on zero medications! But have eliminated propylene glycol as much as I can control… (cleaning supplies, shampoos, hairspray, lotions, hair color, makeup etc…). I find that quite interesting! Delighted to say the least! I get to skip a year of biopsy and ultrasound! Hoping you are able to find a new norm as well!

        Like

  23. Ashley says:

    Hi reading this post and all the comments, I’ll leave my experience as well, I found out I had a severe reaction to nearly pure polyethelene, I was in clinicals for nursing school, we are required to work with any patients including those who have precautions and require gowns, the facility had switched to this plastic gown latex free of course. I had to do extensive work with a patient, plastic doesn’t breathe so of course I sweat like a maniac, I didn’t notice anything that day except some itching behind my neck I thought was a mosquito bite, the next morning I woke up completely covered in hives from my neck, to my Lower torso and all down my arms, what’s crazy is I was wearing 2 layers under the gown and it was the same shape. I freaked out and popped some benedryl and called out of school for the day. My research the next week found the material of the gown to be polyethelene, I remember through my life similar smaller reactions to items and I immediately looked up their chemical make up, in high school doing sports the trainer would give ice in plastic fruit grocery bags, I would end up with a welt the shape of the contact area, I would always have a rash after using bandaids, I called this past week since the material is not listed on the box, “band aid brand” the plastic bandaid adhesive and pad is made with Polyethelene, and the fabric ones only the pad has Polyethelene. co-band or co-flex bandages leaves a horrible itchy welt and is made with PE as well. I was using bactoban ointment on an area on my skin and it was leaving my skin bumpy and sort of like a break out, come to find out it has PE as well! I stopped using it and the area cleared nicely. Of course i always felt terrible and more constipated when I took miralax. I am now looking at everything, and it is in almost all my bathroom products including my deodorant and bath soap. Does nay own have any suggestions for PE and PEG free soaps, deodorants, lotions, items. I

    Like

    • Hi Ashley,
      Thanks for sharing your experience. I have not had any reactions to glycols in what might be called an “inert” state, like polyethylene bags or wrap. I believe there was another person who posted here who had a similar experience and I’ll see if i can find it. I’ll update this post if I do.

      I don’t usually give product recommendations, simply because the manufacturer can change inactive ingredients at any time without notice and you really have to get in the habit of reading every label every time. There are manufacturers who have pledged not to use PEG, but the same manufacturer may use PG or butylene glycol or ethylene glycol and not see that as an issue.
      That said, there are also manufacturers who are committed not to use ANY glycols at all. Finding those brands isn’t always easy but it can be done. There are some posts here and here where I share what I use, but again, just because I can use it may not mean you can use it and not react. There’s a post here about how to find alternatives for yourself. I hope these help.

      Check out those posts and let me know what you think, and share what works for you.

      Be well,
      Amber

      Like

    • kkuzak5gks says:

      The Vermont Soap Co. online sells very pure soap products. The “Soapman” there is chemically sensitive himself, so is aware of the need for good quality products without all the chemicals. I use a lot of DIY recipes for cleaning and personal care products. I really like the deodorant I make: 1/3 cup baking soda; 1/2 cup cornstarch’ 5 Tbsps. coconut oil; 16 drops tea tree essential oil (or less if using purer oil). Mix baking soda and cornstarch in small bowl; heat coconut oil 15 – 30 seconds until liquid. Add tea tree oil and mix. Combine oils and powders and store in airtight container. For lotions and shampoo I use Shea Moisture Raw Shea Chamomile and Argan Oil—Baby Healing Lotion with Frankincense and Myrrh and Baby Head-to-Toe Wash and Shampoo.

      Like

    • Cheryl Zeitler says:

      I have a deoderant suggestion.
      I did some research and unilever had a study last year, the bacteria in your armpits, they eat the sweat and emit the foul odor, cant survive in a 15% salt environment. And my brother researched and found that the bacteria cant survive in high acid.
      Solution for me was a small spray bottle, (like the kind with eyeglasses cleaner). I put in it a solution of white vinegar (about 1/3) and salt water(2/3). The salt water I do 1 tablespoon sea or kosher salt that is safe to 4 tablespoons water.
      The key is to make sure you start with clean arm pits. And spray them during the day. If I forget and go half a day with no spray, I stink. But I just carry the bottle in my purse and when I am in the bathroom or car I spray my whole arm pit.
      Lime juice is really good. I did use watered down lime juice for a while, but citrus was causing me problems and so I had to stop. I loved smelling limey, and it worked even better than the salt water vinegar spray.

      It takes experimenting to figure out. And if you get white marks on your clothing, reduce the salt amount in the water.

      I make my own soap for body washing. I use beef fat and render it into tallow in a crockpot. And then use sodium hydroxide lye to make a hot process soap. It has a different smell, but to me, it is way better than no soap. And I hope to eventually be able to make my own essential oils with distillation process, then I could know they were safe, but can’t afford the equipment yet.

      I made liquid soap also with beef tallow, but you use potassium hydroxide lye for it.

      Eventually I will make enough and be able to make my own laundry soap, I currently use all free and clear and double rinse. And then re wash with baking soda and a double rinse. That gets the detergent out enough I don’t itch.
      Hang in there. It sucks having to do all this, but I was probably smiling ear to ear in the shower when I had soap I could use again and not itch myself raw.

      Like

  24. Rich says:

    Hello Amber,
    I had a spell of dizziness a few days ago approximately thirty minutes after ingesting a regular dose of 17 grams of PEG, for constipation. The dizziness was so bad that I couldn’t drive my car. It lasted about an hour and a half and wore off slowly. I don’t really know if it was caused by the PEG, but that was the only thing in my stomach. I had started a prescription for Zoloft three days earlier, so it may have been a reaction to that drug. I’m going to research that.

    I hope I can figure this out because I’m about to schedule a colonoscopy. To test my theory, I’m thinking of parking my car in the parking lot at the emergency room and ingesting a small dose of PEG with plenty of water. If it happens again, at least I’ll already be where I need to be.

    Sincerely,
    Rich, in Ohio

    Like

    • Hi Rich,
      That sounds dangerous to me. Asking your doc to refer you for an allergy test is the best thing to do, although not all doctors will see your initial reaction as serious. It’s important to be cautious, and most doctors don’t know about PEG/PG allergies yet.
      If you can’t get your doctor to refer you to an allergist, it’s better to put it on your skin rather than inside because your body will react less severely if it’s on your skin. Hives are easier to deal with than having your whole body shut down!

      There are people who have died from shock after ingesting PEG, and you don’t have any idea what your threshold is. Also, reactions can suddenly go from minor to major, depending on your body’s ability to process a substance it experiences as toxic. You can always use the magnesium citrate prep. It’s been safely used for many years and it will give you time to find out if you have an allergy, a sensitivity, or if it’s something else, without delaying your colonoscopy.

      You might also look for a brand of gel without glycols (KY makes one) and bring it with you to the colonoscopy, labeled with your name and birth date. Give it to the nurse and make sure everyone knows you may have a sensitivity to glycols and you know the one you’re bringing is glycol-free. They have never given me any push-back for this, and I’ve had three colonoscopies since discovering my allergy.

      PLEASE do not ingest it, even if you’re near the ER. They won’t necessarily know how to take care of you and may not know that PEG is toxic to some people. This could endanger your life.

      And PLEASE talk to your doctor. Bring the paper listed here and give it to your doctor. It costs a few bucks, but it’s a recognized source on PEG allergy. If you discover you are allergic to PEG, print it and keep copies so you can give them to any doctor you have in the future. It could save your life.

      All the best,
      Amber

      Liked by 1 person

  25. kkuzak5gks says:

    Hi Amber! I hope you are doing well with your knee rehabilitation. I was wondering if you have ever had a dental crown done since your PEG diagnosis. If so, do you have any suggestions as to how this can be done safely with a glycol allergy? Anything you can share about this kind of experience would be very much appreciated. Thank you!

    Like

    • Hi Kerry!
      Other than replacing the topical numbing agent, Emla, with a compounded substitute, I didn’t need to ask for any changes. I hope you are able to get the info you need from your dentist and find alternatives if needed.

      Keep me posted on how that goes.

      My knee is getting better, and I’m very grateful for that. I’m in the UK for three weeks doing genealogical research and although I’ve had to deal with some fatigue due to the knee recovery, I scheduled some down time in the plan and that’s e fact that it’s super fun also helps!

      Best of luck on your dental work.

      Cheers,
      Amber

      Liked by 1 person

  26. kkuzak5gks says:

    Thanks so much, Amber. I’m encouraged by your response! I’ll let you know about my experience—even my silver/mercury filling removal prior to the crown (scary!) I’m researching some other interesting things about allergies which I’ll share as well.

    You are certainly active after surgery–good for you! Hope your UK trip is fruitful and enjoyable. I love genealogy research!

    Like

  27. Courtney Butler says:

    Hi there! I found you because a few months ago, I had ano anaphylatic reaction to a Depo Provera injection. I have since seen an allergist for other allergies and she said that there is no testing for preservatives and additives in injections. I obtained the information leaflet for the drug interactions was given from the pharmacy and see that the second ingredient is proethylene glycol. What is your experience with discovering your allergy? Can glycol allergies be confirmed by testing? Since it was an additive I reacted to (not the hormone, since it stays months and my reaction ended within 48 hours), I’m afraid of any medication or injection! Judging by the list, the reaction was either to pg or methylparaben or propylparaben, which I havent researched at all yet.

    Like

    • Hi Courtney,
      I don’t know how other people find out, but mine was trial and error. I had a reaction to stick deodorant and just by chance overheard someone telling someone else that she was probably reacting to the propylene glycol. I quit using stick deodorant and it went away. Every time I end up with hives, I have accidentally ingested a glycol. I discovered I wa allergic to polyethylene glycol when I took a prescription drug.
      Glycols are often found in pills and capsules because apparently they help the active ingredient cross the blood-brain barrier. I have not seen many injectable drugs where they use glycols because the active ingredient doesn’t have to survive the digestive tract to work.

      Maybe another reader will weigh in with their experience.

      Let us know what you find out, Courney, and welcome!
      Amber

      Like

    • Cheryl Zeitler says:

      Hi courtney, I learned through trial and error (lots of error). I have had issues since around 1999, but never knew the reason until this year when I seemed allergic to the world.
      My allergy doctor (whom I have seen for years) couldnt understand why I was having these reactions to coconut based products and then the skin prick test showed nothing. I went and this time was super persistent about my one time awful experience with miralax and all these other things that happen to contain PEGs. He listened (thank goodness) and said he didn’t know anything about that allergy and needed to refer me to a specialist. So I finally got to see a specialist at Ohio state medical center, and they do not do the testing… Although they looked at all my notes and listened for 2 hours as I told everything I knew and my family history of allergies. The osu doctor referred me to their dermatology department. And they do a patch test. They have to make the patch chemical stuff themselves (I was told) as you can’t buy one for glycols.
      I mentioned how my reaction is central nervous system depression type problems. And I (and my poor mom who has witnessed these reactions and sits with me to keep me awake and functioning) expressed concern about wearing a patch for 48 to 72 hours when I can be immobile in 15 min of inhalation and 30 of skin contact. They rescheduled the test so that I can sit there for 30 min with the patch on and if I start reacting they will remove it and mark it as a reaction in my chart. I can’t get the patch test until mid november, as I will not be safe to drive and they only do Mondays every 3 weeks for the tests.
      I hope that helps. I was terrified at first, when I went from sort of healthy to everything making me sick in only a few months. But now I at least know more. Glycols may be everywhere, but I at least can be better prepared to avoid what I can. I was concerned about multiple chemical sensitivity, because it was all I could find online. I fit so many of their stories, but now I read about them and see that glycols are in a lot of the things they avoid and I wonder if there aren’t a lot more people with polymer and plastic issues and they just don’t know because they were told it was all in their head and there is not any good way to test it. I hope this helps.

      Like

      • kkuzak5gks says:

        Hi Cheryl! I’m sorry to hear you are so reactive to the glycols. I used to be this sensitive too, but have improved greatly. Besides avoidance, I have made an effort to heal my “Leaky Gut” which has been connected to our susceptibility to allergies. I have also been working with a Nutrition Response Testing (NRT) therapist for almost two years with diet and detoxing my organs. Right now, I am undergoing allergy desensitization with a program similar to NAET using a low level laser (Accelerated Clearing Technique) to activate the meridian points (as in acupuncture) while holding the electromagnetic frequency of the allergen. I’m not 100% positive I’m “cleared” from PG (which means a re-programming of my brain’s negative responses toward the allergen), but I have NOT been reacting to incidental exposures. I was in the hospital setting this week as my husband just had surgery and I was exposed to so many things that used to cause my allergic contact dermatitis–fragrances; shaking doctors’ hands who just used handsanitizer; cleaning agents used in my presence in the room; fruit which may have been sprayed with PG for transit; some adhesive bandages etc. I’m not at this point in time, however, willing to expose myself to pure PG in order to test. All I know is that I’m feeling great and my skin is clear. The reason I’m telling you all this is because I wrote some papers you (and anyone else who may be interested) may want to read. One is how to live with a PG/PEG allergy (you already seem to know a lot about it); one is about the allergy-gut connection; and the third one explains the allergy desensitization technique I just mentioned. If you would like them, please send me an email at kerrykuzak@yahoo.com

        Like

  28. Robyn says:

    I find that every time I am exposed to #4 plastics my teeth feeth fuzzy, my skin has red blotches and I become dizzy. On one occasion I actually collapsed. I could hear and see but not move. Is this an allergy to polyethylene, or are there other chemicals that might be causing this?

    Like

    • kkuzak5gks says:

      I read that #4 plastic is low density polyethylene (LDPE). Different chemicals in the plasticizers, colorants, reinforcements and stabilizers may be added to the plastic during processing and fabrication. I wonder why you react more strongly to #4 as compared with the other 5 numbers? Number 1 is PET–polyethylene terephtalate; No. 2 is high density polyethylene (HDPE); No. 3 is polyvinyl chloride (PVC); No. 5 is polypropylene; and No. 6 is polystyrene (styrofoam). They’re all probably petroleum based. You probably already know the products that rate a #4. Best of luck staying clear of it!

      Like

      • Cheryl Zeitler says:

        Hi everyone, I thought it might be helpful to put a list of items I have found that may contain or often contain glycols and their friends. It isn’t exhaustive as I am still learning.
        -Circuit boards and some of the circuitry on them
        -ink jet printer ink, and pen ink
        -polyurothane and stain
        -paints auto and house interior
        -household cleaners
        -hygiene products like soap, toothpaste, deoderant, shampoo, body wash
        -feminine hygiene products
        -adhesives for bandages and other stuff like flooring
        -spandex
        -candy
        -cottage cheese and ice cream
        -coffee creamer liquid
        -soda/pop and bottled coffee productes
        -laundry detergent
        -medicines, pill (such as allegra) and liquid (such as children’s allergy meds) and injections also(i saw they use it for getting things such as cancer medicine and lorazepam in children)
        -theatrical fog (learned that today)
        -PVC

        And then coconut milk is processed with glycols. So if you are super sensitve, like me, it gets trickier.
        Things like waxes (carnuba wax) that gets mixed to go on produce. Or car wax.
        I avoid coconut and palm (glycerins and palmitates and many other names), because unless I contact the company and they say it is 100% certified organic, I personally cant take the chance anymore.

        And I don’t mean to scare anyone, I wasn’t this sensitive until this year. Before that was just skin issues and some random other issues from unwashed store tomatoes and lotions.

        But since I became more sensitive, I really have to do research before any food purchase. I am still working on it and eat pretty much the same 3 or 4 things daily. After 3 months, it’s gotten old, but I try to stay positive, I am able to eat food still.
        And on a side note(sorry so long) I learned ink after printing out info about glycol sensitivity to read and getting a headache. But it quickly (in less than a week) progressed to I can’t be in the same room as my printer. And when I print anything I run in the other room and hold my breath and take it straight outside to air out for the rest of the day. Then I just limit time reading the papers for a few weeks while the ink airs out.

        Liked by 1 person

  29. Heather says:

    I’ve been using a certain style of Kotex pads for many, many years with no problems. I recently bought a new package that said “new look, softer feel” on it. I wore them for a few days and developed an itchy rash in a very uncomfortable place. Switched to Always brand and rash cleared. I called Kotex and they looked up lot number and said they changed from polypropylene to polyethylene glycol. Bingo!

    Like

    • Hi Heather,
      This is one of the most frustrating things about being allergic to an inactive ingredient: Manufacturers can change the ingredients anytime, often assuming they are improving a product or medicine, and suddenly something that has been safe for years is not. This is the chief reason why “safe” product lists are so challenging.
      I’m glad to know you found an alternative, and sorry you had to go through a rash to find out.
      Amber

      Like

  30. Dee says:

    I have an allergy to PG, not sure about PEG, but, I have to have a hernia repaired and the surgeon mentioned the mesh I need is a polypropylene mesh… Since I have an allergy to Propylene, I have fought wi h him and his nurses for answers from the makers of this mesh whether or not I’ll react from it after surgery. Anyone have any advice they can give me? There’s not much out there on the common compounds between the two or if they’re closely related, all I keep finding are contact dermatitis issues with polypropylene mesh but no links with allergies to propylene glycol. Please help!

    Like

    • Hi, Dee,
      My allergy is to the glycol portion of the compound. I can wrap my arm in polyethylene film and not have a reaction, and the cartilage in both my replaced knees is polyethylene. Polypropylene is is similar and is in a lot of carpeting, in food containers, and lots of plastics. You might see if you can get a piece of the mesh fabric from the manufacturer and attach it to your skin to see if you get a reaction.
      Maybe someone else on the list will weigh in with their experience – but please let us know how you resolve it, Dee.
      Best of luck,
      Amber

      Liked by 1 person

    • kkuzak5gks says:

      I’m sorry I don’t have any personal experience with this hernia dilemma. Being allergic to both propylene glycol and polyethylene glycol always has me on edge with all synthetic materials since I do get allergic contact dermatitis from many different sources besides PG and PEG. Polyester is one of the big ones as it has PG resins in it. I also know I react to derivatives of both glycols when I’ve been exposed to them in medicines or personal care products.. My extreme reactions might just depend on how over loaded my organs are to these allergens. It’s understandable to be apprehensive about the use of composite meshes/materials which are being used nowadays with so many kinds of surgeries. I don’t know if anyone can know definitively ahead of time if a person with a PG allergy would have a problem with the repair materials to be used. It’s concerning, of course, because these repair materials are designed to be long term in your body. IMO the bottom line is that your doctor has the responsibility to keep you safe and needs to research ALL the materials he/she will be using on you: Such as: stitches (I heard dissolvable ones are bad for PG allergy people); staples; surgical tape; special glues (adhesives can be bad), etc. If there is another option for type of surgical repair, the doctor needs to do research concerning it and communicate his/her findings with you so an informed decision can be made. I wish you the very best of luck.

      Like

  31. My experience so far has been that until a doctor knows that I’m going to check out the meds myself, they just say, “sorry, you’re too high a risk.” Which leaves me looking for any doctor that will take me with my issues, rather than the best doctor for my condition.

    For my eye surgery last week, I took samples of chemicals into my allergist and she did a test to see if I’d react. I didn’t, thankfully. The two chemicals I had tested had ambiguous ingredients that I couldn’t find in the chemical databases I use, so I asked for samples.

    Fortunately, all was well, because if I wasn’t able to have my lenses replaced, I would have lost my eyesight.
    amber

    Like

  32. Sheree says:

    Hello! I like to know if I am allergic to propylene glycol, does that mean I’m also allergic to butylene glycol or any kinds of glycol? Thank you for the advice

    Like

    • Hello, Sheree,
      There is no way to know for sure unless you either have a test, or discover on your own by accident. I thought I was just allergic to propylene glycol until I got hives from a medication that had polyethylene glycol in it.

      Other people are only sensitive to one of the glycols. Others of us are allergic to anything vaguely related to a glycol – like glycerin or sweeteners like xylitol.

      Ask your doc for a test. Then you’ll know for sure.

      Best of luck, Sheree. Let us know how it turns out.

      Amber

      Like

  33. Robin Harris says:

    I am experiencing skin blistering (dry) and skin peeling on my fingers and palms when I come in contact with page protectors and blue, incontinence pads I had thought it was a late allergy but am now wondering if it is a polypropylene sensitivity. Any feedback will be appreciated.

    Like

  34. Neil says:

    Hi,

    I’ve had real problems with polypropylene for a long time and I have so much I would love to discuss with others who are feeling the same.

    Would anyone be willing to chat on skype or set up a community where we can all chat on slack? https://slack.com/

    I am literally in a hotel room where all the pillows and mattresses are polypropylene. I feel like life is impossible.

    Thanks

    Like

    • Cheryl Zeitler says:

      Hi neil, i often have felt like this is an impossible sensitivity to live with, and it can be overwhelming. If you want to chat, you can email me. The first part of address is cherylraterman
      Followed by @yahoo.com
      I figure breaking the email apart may help me not get junk and spam. I can listwn, via email, or figure something. It can be overwhelming to try and figure all this stuff out. If you email, put something like polyethylene in the subject, so if it goes to spam i will know to look at it.

      Like

      • Neil says:

        Thanks.

        I will have a think about the best way to explain. I don’t want to fire a huge email at you about the last 10 years of my life where I have been wondering what is wrong with me, and all of the crazy stories about how I tried to fix it, and what other people/doctors have said.

        Like

      • Cheryl Zeitler says:

        Oh no worries, i often think the same thing when someone i havent seen since college asks how i am or if i am going to see a new doctor or even one i already have seen.

        Also, i think the discussion group is a good idea, i have trouble with the format here, as i use my cell to read it. But this page was a huge reassurance for me when i was ready to just quit looking for answers.

        I dont mind random long messages from anyone wanting to chat about issues they have, if someone can be helped by pouring out a five page email, that is good. This stuff can be really overwhelming, and this isnt the only aspect of a persons life.
        I hope everyone is having a okay day. And thank you all for what you write here. It truly does help.

        Like

    • kkuzak5gks says:

      I would be interested in joining a discussion community if it was set up via Slack.

      Like

  35. Evelyn says:

    Hi Amber,
    I recently had a horrible reaction while prepping for a colonoscopy. Upon doing research online to figure out what could have caused the reaction, I noticed that some of the same people that had an adverse reaction to Miralax had also had a reaction from lubricant and also contrast agents used with MRI and CT scan. I have had a reaction with all 3 products listed above. This evening I had started a daily probiotics regime ( using Align) within minutes five minutes of swallowing the capsule I began to feel strange, as if my blood pressure was rising, I had a similar feeling while consuming the Miralax. My question is, how can I tell when a product has the same ingredient if it os not listed ( I’ve read in other posts that PEG is not always listed.). I am becoming increasingly concerned since the reactions I am having after consuming or using a product is coming on quicker.
    With the Miralax I experienced, hives, itching and swollen throat/ glands and a feeling of high blood pressure, I also became extremely tired.
    With the lubricant I broke out in hives
    With the contrast agent my face became flush and I felt as if my blood pressure was rising. I should point out that the very first reaction was from the contrast agent and then the lubricant the Miralax was third and now this evening the reaction with the Align probiotics. Any help or advice will be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you .

    Like

    • With the CT scan the symptoms you’ve expressed are quite common and pass very quickly – they’re not usually an allergic reaction, but of course it’s always possible. I had them too, and so do people with out allergies.
      The Miralax and the lubricant likely had PEG as an ingredient, and I don’t know what Align is, but there are usually ways to find out what the inactive ingredient are. Here are some posts that might help: Be a Label Detective 11 Ways to Live with Glycol Allergies
      Allergies, How to Save Your Own Life
      Amber

      Like

      • Evelyn says:

        Thank you for the information. The Align is a probiotic that my gastroenterologist recommended for me. I will definitely start reading the information in the links you provided now!

        Thanks again!

        Like

    • kkuzak5gks says:

      It is very possible that you had a reaction to Align. It is full of synthetic ingredients—lubricants, stabilizers, binders and fillers. I would be especially suspect of the COLORANTS (FD&C blue and Riboflavin) as the glycols are used in the processing of artificial colors, flavors and preservatives. There are many probiotics which are better and don’t contain so many artificial ingredients. I like Garden of Life brand (Dr. Perlmutter) and change the type occasionally to get a better diversity of good bacteria.

      Like

      • Evelyn says:

        Thank you for the information. I will check out the brand that you recommended because the Align really flared up a reaction that I am still feeling as of this afternoon.

        Like

  36. M@D2N says:

    I run a blog myself about chemical allergies, and have a professional technical background related to chemicals. One of my own strongest allergens is PG as patch tested. I have discovered that I also have reactions to PEG. I am in the process of trying to figure out whether PEG was on my original patch test, but my reaction is clear.

    What I haven’t seen on this page or in these comments is information about polyester. Polyester is made with polyethylene/monoethylene glycol. Because the other key ingredient is much more hazardous, extra polyethylene glycol is added to the mixture to make sure as much as possible of the second ingredient reacts. I am so allergic to polyester because of my PG and PEG allergies that I have had to change all my clothing to cotton, wool, and silk, including the seams, which are commonly sewn with polyester thread even if the fabric is 100% natural. Spandex/lycra/elastane (all the same thing, but different names used around the world) are made from polyester, so they also contain some portion of PEG.

    Polyethylene glycol and glycol compounds are also in PEG (recycling symbol 1) plastic bottles and jars. These containers also tend to contain phthalates (which are not good chemicals) to add flexibility. These compounds can leach into the contents of the bottles and jars.

    Propylene glycol is the most common carrier in natural and artificial flavours and fragrances, which means that anything that lists “natural flavours,” “natural fragrance,” “artificial flavour,” or “artificial/synthetic fragrance” can contain PG. Recently I have been dismayed to realize that candy containing added flavours causes my throat to tighten, in addition to the gastrointestinal difficulties I was encountering before. Much scarier! I may need to get an epipen again (used to have one for bee stings).

    Unfortunately, doctors are not well-versed in the prevalence of chemicals in medications and in our environments. The results of this and other chemical allergies are devastating, and I hate to see people suffer from not having the information they need to be healthy. My website is http://www.defaulttonature.com and I would welcome further communication.

    – M

    Like

    • kkuzak5gks says:

      I went to your blog “Default to Nature”. It’s a great site– Interesting articles and VERY organized–well done!

      I agree with you about polyester resins containing PG. I get skin chaffing every time I’m near it. Plastics can also be bad–especially the water bottles when they get warm. They’re not healthy for anyone OR our planet! The three ingredients I have the most difficulty convincing PG/PEG allergy sufferers to stay away from are: 1) “natural flavors” (as you mentioned) because they can contain between 50 – 100 different ingredients and, in the USA, our FDA does not supervise these “incidental additives”. 2) Also, GLYCERIN which is also known as glycerol. I react to it, just as I do to many of the glycols. Glycerin can come from propylene– Propylenge Glycol comes from propylene oxide– and PEG comes from ethylene oxide. I’m not sure of the direct chemical connections, but my body seems to know! 3) I also have trouble with synthetic Citric Acid. I read on the Dow Chemical site that PG is an ingredient used in the compounding of citrus flavors.

      After doing lots of reading and research because of my chemical allergies, I have come to the conclusion that allergies, and many of our chronic diseases/disorders, stem from our gut. About 80% of our immune system is found in the gut and because of our inadequate food supply (chemicals/pesticides/GMOs), other environmental toxins like heavy metals which are found in the air and water, and certain medications (NSAIDS, antibiotics, steroids, etc.), many of us have developed “Leaky Gut”. This condition makes for a porous intestinal lining which allows food molecules that would normally be too large, to pass through the intestinal lining. Once these abnormally large molecules get through, a natural defense reaction occurs whereby the body builds antibodies to identify the larger molecule as an invader and attack it. The result of this antibody reaction is what we call an “allergy/sensitivity” and any tissue in the body can express this type of sensitivity. Once this Leaky Gut begins, a cascade of events occur that result in increasingly more sensitivities to food, environmental chemicals and airborne irritants (pollen, dust, mold) can occur. Even though specific nutritional and lifestyle modifying actions can be instituted to heal Leaky Gut itself (especially the avoidance of inflammatory foods like gluten, sugar and dairy), the body still continues to make the antibodies it built as its initial response. Conventional medicine acknowledges the Leaky Gut Syndrome but, to my knowledge, does not address it. I have started to go to holistic practitioners because they better understand the importance of getting to the root cause of problems instead of just treating the symptoms. I know many people will not buy into the ideas I just mentioned, but I thought you might like to do a blog article concerning this ever growing philosophy of the allergy-gut connection.

      Like

  37. Debbie says:

    I have recently started to notice reactions to certain woods and plastics. I just opened my prescription bottles and my hands started itching and burning and I could feel my hands tighting. I also get this same sensation in the early morning hours. My hands and feet will start itching, burning and swelling to where I want to ripe off my fingernails and toenails! Same happens with my daughter. I’m 56 and she is 32. It’s usually in between the fingers and toes. All I know is it drives me crazy! But the bottle cap thing is getting worse. So not sure if I’m allergic to polypropylene. Same I have noticed with certain wood when I help my husband carry it in the house. Some leave welts in my arms. Also surgical tape I have just become allergic too! Uugghhhh

    Like

    • kkuzak5gks says:

      It sure sounds like you’re having an allergic reaction. PEG is used as a green wood stabilizer. Medical adhesive tapes and bandages can consist of a pressure sensitive adhesive and a backing which is a carrier for the adhesive. Both the adhesive and the backing may consist of glycerol esters and plasticizers. The 3M company’s products contain both PG and PEG and Dow Chemical’s adhesives have PEG in them, according to what I found on the internet. The glycols are used in many, many products, so you may want to get chemical patch testing done as soon as possible to know what you’re dealing with. Avoidance can be difficult, especially with pharmaceuticals. There are many synonyms and cross reactors. I wish you the best of luck!

      Like

  38. Debby Davies says:

    Hi,

    I’m allergic to PEG and PG. I’ve recently started getting a sore tingly mouth after eating fruits such as apple , nectarine and grapes (non organic) but can eat home grown or organic with no problem. I see others have mentioned concerns about the chemicals on fruit causing reactions. i saw my allergy doctor today, (he hasn’t met anyone with this allergy before ] and he reckons it more likely to be from sulphites!! I’m not convinced. If anyone has found out anymore about the chemicals on fruit or can recommend someone to see about this allergy in Australia that would be great, I’m feeling a bit over whelmed by it at the moment.

    Thanks

    Like

  39. Hi Debbie,
    First of all, tingling in your mouth is always a serious symptom. A life-threatening reaction often starts with tingling. Please make sure you have an epi-pen on hand at all times, and if you need to use it, that you have someone immediately take you to your doctor or the hospital right afterward. In the meantime, please keep yourself safe, take your doc’s advice, and try to only eat fruits you know you won’t react to.

    In the US we have a database called Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) that outlines the potential hazards of chemicals used in the workplace. Australia may have a similar database, or the chemicals used on your fruit may even be listed in the US MSDS.

    I’d start with the store where I buy produce and ask the produce manager who their produce distributor is for the fruit you reacted to. If it’s a local farm, find the number of the farm and call them. If it’s a produce distributor or broker, find their number and try to find a sympathetic person who might be able to help you track how the produce got there and what it was sprayed with.

    It is possible to find out these things – but how easy it is will depend on how gracefully you handle the human interactions and how kind or sympathetic the people you talk to are. Try to get across that you’re only interested in finding out what’s causing a reaction, and that you don’t expect them to do all the work for you – just ask if they can give you a bit of info you can pursue on your own. Because my son also has allergies, I’ve had some luck with letting them know that my child’s doctor has sent me on this quest because we can’t figure out what he’s reacting to.

    I am always apologetic for interrupting them – because I am, and helping me with my allergies is not in their job description. It’s also essential that you call or visit during slow times. Don’t come in or call when they’re slammed with deliveries or customers. That may take some planning ahead, but it makes all the difference in the world if you call or show up at the time of day when someone is bored and wishing they had a new challenge instead of trying to juggle ten different things.

    Also, the distributor will usually get fruit from multiple growers, so contacting the store right after you bought the offending produce is more likely to get you accurate information than if you wait, but it’s still worth looking into even if it’s later, so you have that info on hand if it happens again.

    One more thing – it is possible to develop and allergy to any fruit, organic or otherwise, even if you’ve had it many many times without incident. My son had lots of mostly organic fruit during his childhood, and as an adult, he worked as the baker on a farm where they grew apples, pears, cherries, strawberries, blackberries, blueberries, hazelnuts, walnuts – all kinds of organically grown fruit and nuts. He baked an apple tart one day and had a mild tingling reaction, and baked a pear and apple tart the next day and had his first anaphyllactic reaction.

    Even the allergist I took him to was stunned. Patch tests showed he was highly allergic to all the above fruits except blueberries, cherries, and walnuts, despite having eaten them his entire life with no adverse effects. The doc said she’d never seen anyone react to pears like he did, because pears are often suggested as a safe fruit for people with allergies. So it is possible to develop a sudden severe allergy to pretty much anything.

    Best of luck, Debby. Please be careful, check back, and tell us how it goes.

    Like

    • Debby Davies says:

      Thanks, will do. The allergist didn’t think it warranted an epipen!

      Like

    • Debby Davies says:

      Hi Amber, you were so right, I had a nasty allergic reaction On Sat night at a friends party, a few minutes after eating some cashew nuts ( won’t try any though), never reacted to them before so I’m suspicious there was propylene glycol on them. I ended up using my daughters Epipen as i was at the point of passing out and felt like my throat was tightening. I spent a few hours in the ED department for observation. I have been in contact with the allergist to get an Epipen of my own.A bit scary as it seems like propylene glycol is in all sorts of consumable

      Like

  40. Stacey Moerschell says:

    I’ve just noticed my eyes get dry due to diuretics I take, so I started using Blink. It seems the more I used it the more I needed it, a vicious cycle. It gets to a point my eyes are so red and irritated I could scream. So today I just stopped!,.cold turkey. And my eyes feel so much better. Is this an allergy I wonder. What else could this be in causing issues? I’d love to learn more. I’m glad I found this blog!

    Like

  41. Sharon says:

    Hi I am booked in for a knee replacment this month, I have a PEG allergy and my consultant is trying to find out if I can have it done, because it is made of polyethylene glycol.
    I have had anaphylactic reaction to other procedures.
    As you can imagine I am very worried.
    Sharon.

    Like

  42. Carolyn says:

    Hi there my son breaks out in a nasty rash on his face after using baby wipes and I’ve recently discovered sun cream too! Do you think this could be PEG related? I was researching the ingredients in both products and PEG was the only chemical in both wipes and suncream. I hadn’t heard of it before that. Kind regards.

    Like

    • kkuzak5gks says:

      I’m sorry to hear your son is having skin reactions. I tested positive to propylene glycol (PG) with patch testing, but my confirmation of a related PEG allergy was me connecting the dots with the ingredients in two medications which were causing me to have skin outbreaks. So yes, it is very possible your son is reacting to the PEG in the baby wipes and the sun cream. When he is old enough, you may want to consider having allergy testing done to confirm any possible sensitivities/allergens to avoid. Until then, I would use as little chemicals in/on his body as possible. IMO chemical allergies are getting more prevalent because of the toxic nature of our environment and our inadequate gut microbiome to defend against these toxic invaders. Plain soap and water is best for personal hygiene. My PG/PEG “safe” soap is purchased through the Vermont Soap Company. My zinc oxide sunscreen is Badger Broad Spectrum SPF 30. I wish you and your son the best.

      Like

      • Jadiel Montesdeoca says:

        I seem to react to propylene glycol but my reaction is irritation without a rash especially when using my old deodorant. My armpits would hurt but only when touched so it didn’t bother me through my everyday life (only in the shower). I didn’t know it was the propylene glycol. Someone wrote that if one is allergic to any glycol then you may allergic to sodium laureth sulfate but I am not or at least not yet. I hope I do not because I only found one body wash/soap that I can use as all the others have Propylene glycol. Also if anyone wants to try out a chemical free deodorant use milk of magnesia. It works fairly well. I’d say it covers 90% of the smell. After a long day though it is less effective, but it’s better than using all these chemicals.

        Liked by 1 person

  43. Andrew says:

    Hi Everyone!

    My symptoms first started 5 years ago. I have an office at work that is a 20ft container. I decided one day to give it a massive clean out and paint it, then laid cheap carpet tiles. Within a month I had a constant runny nose, unstoppable really bad sinus tingling and headaches.

    I started cycling as I seemed to improve it, my symptoms were almost worse at home.

    Several visits to the GP and various antibiotics, antihistamines and nose sprays and nothing seemed to stop it. They gave up and more or less told me to put up with it, only an allergy!

    So I did, fast forward to 2014 and I decided on another whim to sort out by horrible teeth. I had what post fillings/crowns and terrible pain above my canines and the whole left side of my Jaw. So the dentist gave me two antibiotics metronidazole honestly it was hell within 24 hours I lasted four awful days on it, went back to Dentist my whole face was bright red my sinuses were going mad tingling but the runny nose had now stopped. He couldn’t believe it and was panicing that it might be an allergy to the crowns but couldn’t get them off, so sent me to my GP.

    The GP diagnosed (seriously) Farmer Face from the wind cycling and atypical facial pain for the tingling caused by dentist hitting a nerve. I have been everywhere but EVERY consultant was saying the same. I refused the pharma they kept offering Anti Seizure – Anti Depressives etc as I felt weird enough as it was.

    Fast forward again too Oct 2016 – I became aware that I was having an awful summer symptoms quite bad. I decided to clean up office I had loads of samples in there and hovered it. Without really peaking it together my symptoms improved at work a little, but I also became aware my eldest Daughter was making me worse. This was the FIRST time I realised my environment was causing a lot of it. She works in Lush in the UK and they are Really strong smells – then my washing machine was smelling of off detergent from build up so I told my wife and thought nothing of it. She started loading my clothes and cycling clothes with loads of chemicals and I was getting worse and worse.

    Then finally the penny dropped, my wife and three daughters wear loads of shampoos. cosmetics well you know the score loads of PG PEG etc. I became aware even away from home certain days were worse, linked to polyester. My wife and taken up Vaping in April 16 and I started to have full blown throat closing runny eyes and nose choking at night and around her. So looked in to what Vaping was made of and voila PG. All my samples in the office were tons of brand new furry type polyester rugs, my carpet tiles Polypropylene. Then I recalled the metronidazoleso looked it up thinking hey that must haver had it in, no it didn’t but I did learn they had to recall the drug to repackage it in the UK to include the warning that Vaper had to stop vaping as it stopped the body being able to process PG and it had put Vaper in hospital!!

    Anyway lots of things fell in to place, I stopped using Bubble Bath and Shower Gels and Shampoos randomly 10 years ago. Couldn’t stand the smell (or so I thought) All the personal care products ~I used was the same soap for 10 years (Olive NO PEG or PG) My deodorant loads of chemical but not PEG or PG its as if I knew. I recall lots of times trying other and lasting a day or even worse going back up and leaping in the bath to get the new product off me as it was driving me mad. The cycling only felt like it improved me because I was away from everyone. I am about to have the final bit of dental work removed which is a Polyresin filling!!

    I think the Antibiotic stopping me processing PG sent my allergy to the limit by maxxing out my exposure.

    Sorry for the long post. I have an immunology appointment end of the month any suggestions? Anyone heard of purely Sinus related symptoms?? Seems bizarre to me. but I can replicate it

    Like

  44. Andrew says:

    Sorry forgot. I used to vary my hydration tablets for my cycling bottle one day my wife bought me a Vit C one and wow it set it off like a mad thing, it didn’t occur to me to check out what was in it until I read this from a UK Allergy Dr in the NHS!! That exact one was what my wife had bought me..

    Personally speaking I think a lot of people are getting allergies from PG & PEG and maybe other chemicals but they don’t know as their use has really ramped up in the last 20 years. As a kid I wouldn’t have been in so much contact, but now the rotten chemical are in so much you cant avoid it.

    http://www.vle.eastmidlandsdeanery.nhs.uk/pluginfile.php/40807/mod_resource/content/1/FGR%20Immunology%20Talk-Liau%20Khan.pdf

    Like

  45. Kerry Kuzak says:

    You’ve really played detective these last few years! I hope you’re not allergic to the glycols, but with your exposures and reactions it certainly seems possible. You’re the first person I’ve heard of with just sinus problems to these allergens. It’s important you get a formal diagnosis, though, because these reactions could make you experience anaphylaxis. Vaping, of course, is really bad. You’d expect to have a sore throat, sinus problems, headache, nausea, hives, numbness in the fact, etc.. I don’t know about your upcoming dental work, but metronidazole does contain PEG. PG and PEG are found extensively in pharmaceuticals, cleaning products, personal care products and processed food/drinks. Your immunologist will know what kind of test is best for you. I had patch testing done because I experience dermatitis. Wishing you the best with improving your health. Write if you have questions after your diagnosis.

    Like

  46. Elizabeth Butler says:

    I live in the UK, have been an asthmatic all my life, my first allergy was at 2 weeks old to a woollen vest my mum had made me. I’m now 60 years old and still alive having survived some truly awful asthma attacks in my teens. About 10 years ago I became increasingly sensitive to washing powder, softener, shampoos, soaps, toothpaste the list goes on. I eventually identified this as multiple chemical sensitivity, which is recognised in the UK. I’ve always been an avid label reader and I think it’s bad that not all chemicals are listed on products. I just thought some of you guys might find the link below useful, as you mostly seem to be American. Propylene glycol is a recent addition to my list of things I avoid, which is how I found your informative blog. I’d never realised before that it was in anaesthetics and always have difficulty recovering from them, although fortunately I had not had too many anaesthetics. It really irritates me to see medical professionals, ie on wikipedia, dismissing these problems as psychological, as we all know here and itchy rash is not psychosomatic, neither is asthma. A 2 week old baby developing an allergic rash to wool is not having a psychological reaction. Hope you guys are all finding solutions and ways to avoid chemicals. My symptoms improved dramatically once I changed all my cleaning, washing, self care and shampoo products.

    https://www.allergycosmos.co.uk/mcs/

    Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s